IUP Anthropology Well Represented at Annual Conference on Historical and Underwater Archaeology

Posted on 1/19/2016 11:54:32 AM

Anthropology undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty presented 10 papers and posters at the 49th annual Conference on Historical and Underwater Archaeology held in Washington, D.C. from January 6–9, 2016.

The presentations represented the wide variety of work undertaken by students and faculty and highlighted independent student research, which is a hallmark of anthropological training.

Anthropology undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty at the 49th annual Conference on Historical and Underwater Archaeology
Photo: Faculty and students, past and present, at 2016 annual Conference on Historical and Underwater Archaeology (l to r: Ben Ford, Stefanie Smith, Ashley Taylor, David Breitkreutz, Jay Taylor, Jordon Loucks, Ashley McCuistion, Timothy Carn, and Michael Whitehead)

Ben Ford organized a symposium titled “Hanna’s Town: Answering New Questions About Pennsylvania’s Frontier Using Old Collections” that included presentations from five current and former MA in Applied Archaeology students:

  • Timothy Carn, “Database Creation for the Legacy Collection of Hannastown”
  • David Breitkreutz, “Spatial Analysis of Hanna’s Town: Settlement and Geophysical Frontiers”
  • Ashley Taylor, “Geophysical Investigations at the Hanna’s Town Cemetery, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania”
  • Stefanie Smith, “Bones of the Frontier: Subsistence Practices at Hanna’s Town”
  • Jay Taylor, “An Analysis of Tools from Hanna’s Town”

Bill Chadwick authored two papers with Elisabeth LaVinge (JMA):

  • “Regional Synthesis and Best Practices for the Application of Geophysics to Archaeological Projects in the Middle Atlantic Region”
  • “’The Brandywine Creek has two branches which are very good for crossing:’ The search for Trimble’s Ford”

Undergraduate Sarah La Fevre presented on her McNair research in the talk “Digital Historic Preservation: Recording and Interpreting the Patterson-Altman’s Mill with 3-D Scanning.”

Graduate student Hannah Harvey presented a poster on her thesis research, titled “Glass, Floods, and ‘Gov’ment Work’: Exploring Industrial Heritage in Blairsville, Southwestern Pennsylvania.” Graduate student Ashley McCuistion presented her preliminary thesis results in the forum “Research in a Nutshell: Powered by Pecha Kucha.”

Michael Whitehead and Ben Ford presented findings from their grant-funded research at Ft. Necessity National Battlefield in the talk “New Data from the Great Meadows: Geophysical and Archaeological Investigations at Fort Necessity National Battlefield.”

In addition to current students, several former students who are now working in cultural resource management (CRM) or enrolled in PhD programs presented their work.

Fun Fact: Current and past IUP students represented 1 percent of the 1,400 conference attendees.

Department of Anthropology